Preserving Manchester’s Historic Light

Preserving Manchester's Historic Light LogoTrinity United Church of Christ has been a part of Manchester long before the current building’s cornerstone was laid in 1863. The connection between Trinity and the town is evidenced by the presence of the church’s steeple on Manchester’s logo. Over the years, the townspeople of Manchester have thought of the light in Trinity’s steeple as a sign of welcome and comfort.

Trinity has played and continues to play a vital role in Manchester, not only by serving as a spiritual home, but also by responding to a variety of community needs.

The church building is architecturally significant and listed on the Maryland Historical Trust’s Inventory of State Historic Sites. The ornate church nave and the decorative tin ceiling are seldom seen in churches today. Unfortunately, the ceiling above the sanctuary is sagging. Closer inspection reveals that many of the original rough-sawn trusses have sheared, split or cracked.

Due to the damage, the congregation can no longer safely worship in the sanctuary. Every effort is being made to restore the ceiling, allowing the congregation which has been a presence in the community for over 250 years to continue to serve the community of Manchester.

The cost of the repairs is significant. The ceiling and truss repairs will cost over $300,000 to restore and will take almost six months to complete. Without this restoration work, the church would need to close, extinguishing the light of an important center piece of Manchester’s history.

Please help support the efforts to preserve Manchester’s historic light.

Donate Now

If you prefer to mail your donation, our address is: Trinity UCC, PO Box 730, 3229 York Street, Manchester, MD 21102

Restoration Progress Gallery

Front Facade of Trinity Church Showing SteepleLarger View of the Nave Decorative Tin Ceiling and Distinctive Central MotifShowing Bowed CeilingExterior Scaffolding TowerScaffolding Mid-Dance Floor BeamsLight ProtectionShowing the Intricate Scaffolding Detail with Stairways Leading Up 21 Feet to the Dance Floor Work AreaDance Floor ReadyTemp Shoring TowerShowing Dance Floor Work Area Above Scaffolding and Progress of the Removal of the Tin CeilingDetached Ceiling From Rafter Causing Ceiling SagUnder the Tin Ceiling, a Damaged Original Plaster Ceiling with Decorative Stenciling Was FoundCenter Medallion Detail Found Under Tin CeilingDecorative Wall Finish at Cove MoldingDemolition of Plaster and LathDemolition Complete as of July 7, 2017 - All of the Tin and Plaster Ceiling and Furring Strips Have Been RemovedBroken Rafter 2Broken Rafter 1Split and Cracked TrussShowing One of the Ceiling Support Trusses that Has SplitShowing One of the Ceiling Support Trusses that is Cracked